Families Belong Together-Reflections on the June 30th March

I’m a little sunburned, my feet hurt, I’m tired, I didn’t get to do any painting today, and now I have to go to work and wait on tables.  I won’t get home until at least midnight, and by then I’ll be hungry and even more tired.

But at least I have a safe home to return to with a bed, a fridge full of food and maybe even a beer to enjoy while I put my feet up.  And I get to come home to my dear mother who always puts the porch light on for me.

The migrant-refugee families at our nation’s southern border have none of these gifts.  After weeks and weeks of traveling by foot and rail these families arrived at the US border sunburned, tired, and hungry.  Instead of finding a porch light on, and sanctuary from the violence they left behind, they were met with what I can only describe as evil and inhumanity.

Imagine having your children forcibly taken away from you and then being locked up without due process simply because you were trying to protect your children from the daily violence of your own country.  Imagine the feeling of helplessness that these refugees are feeling because of Trump’s “zero-tolerance” policies.  Imagine the anguish that is weighing heavily on their hearts as they continue to endure separation from their children while those who separated these families now stumble along trying to figure out how to put them back together again.

Oh, Humpty Dumpty!  Trump has had a big fall!

And let us not forget the children and the terror and trauma that they have been put through.  They have witnessed violence and experienced fear in their own country; now they have witnessed it here in ours.  Shameful.

And so, I marched with about 200 others today along US 1.  People of all ages and backgrounds coming together to address the issue of the day:  Families Belong Together.

One very angry man began shouting at us “What about American families that are being separated?”  I said “We care about them, too, but to my knowledge 1,000’s of American families are not being rounded up, separated, and detained.”  He then used some profanity and I simply shouted “Thanks!  I love you!”

My take-away from both today’s supporters and haters:  There are many injustices in the world today, and all need to be addressed.  Human rights abuses, homelessness, war, poverty, child abuse, domestic violence, climate change, plastics in our oceans, the worldwide refugee crisis, human trafficking, endangered species, and an endless list of issues are all important causes to be supported.  Our world is wounded and in desperate need of healing, but it is impossible to take on every cause and every injustice.  Today thousands of us across the US took on this issue.  Today I marched.  Tomorrow I’ll pray, and Monday I’ll make some more calls to Congress.

Do what you can to help the causes that matter to you, but please (pretty-please!) don’t be that angry man in the car with the typical “teenager” approach to this issue.  In the end the “what about Johnny next door” argument didn’t work with our parents when we were kids; it’s not helping today, either.

Me with my sign today.

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